Neely’s Ultimate Recovery Bars

Tuesday January 27th, 2015

Neely Gracey is a professional runner with the Hanson’s Brooks Original Distance Project. An 8-time NCAA Div. II national champion, Neely was the top US female, finishing in 13th, at the 2013 World Cross Country Championships. She’s passionate about her Osmo. Even more so, she LOVES creating new recipes with Acute Recovery. Check out her amazing recovery bars recipe below and why she believes “real food” is her go-to recovery source!

Ever stand in the aisle at the grocery store looking up and down at the bazillion different protein bar options? Reading the back of each one to make sure the one you purchase is not full of high fructose corn syrup and artificial colors/flavors. All the while trying to ignore all the unrecognizable and unpronounceable words on the lengthy ingredients list. Then of course, you see the price of the one you finally choose… two to three dollars for something you will inhale in seconds? Ugh. The battle is real.

I search for coupons, have narrowed down the kind I like, and on occasion, while traveling, will pick up some bars from the store. But these days, I have been in the habit of creating my own concoctions, and loving every minute of it! I am so excited about my discoveries, and especially since Osmo offered to share it with all of you.

Recipe basics
– 4 scoops Osmo Acute Recovery
– 2 T spoons nut butter/seed butter/nutella/honey (or a combo of these)
– ¼ cup quick oats (not necessary but helps make the bars more transportable)
– ¼ cup mix-ins (choc chips, nuts, dried fruit, seeds etc)
– water

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Place the Osmo in a small mixing bowl, add in all ingredients except water. Using a fork, smoosh things around. Add in 1 T of water at a time and keep smashing with the fork until the mixture becomes crumbly but is no longer powdery or dry. At this point, portion into 4 and form the bars on wax paper using your fingers to get the right size and shape. Pop in the fridge for an hour, then plastic wrap individually to take on your next adventure! I keep mine in the fridge but they rarely last long.

Approximate Nutrition per bar
15-17grams protein
150 calories

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So far, these are my favorite flavors:
-Dark Stinger: Cashew butter with crystalized ginger and dark choc
-Bees Knees: Honey, peanut butter, choc chips
-Nutty Buddy: Nutella, crushed peanuts, choc chips

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So what are you waiting for? Mostly all the ingredients are in your kitchens already so get creative and share your favorite combos with us!

Want to share your favorite recipe? We’ll post it on our blog, along with your favorite pics. Send us an email at sales@osmonutrition.com


Osmo or BUST!

Tuesday January 13th, 2015

We love it when athletes send us emails about their experiences with Osmo. And we think this one’s “blog-worthly,” so have a read….

I am an athlete. I am not perfect. I have gastrointestinal sensitivities. I envy anyone reading this who has a so-called “iron stomach”. Lucky you!

But let us think about this for a second:

Just because your stomach can handle anything, does this mean you should put anything in it?
You are on a long, hot training ride. You are all out of fluids, so you decide to stop at a gas station and guzzle down a fruit punch Gatorade and a Coke, then top off your water bottles with water, or maybe you buy another Gatorade to top them off. You have quenched your thirst for the time being, but have you provided your body with the best possible fluids for optimal performance the remainder of the ride, the next day’s ride, the day after that, and so on? Likely not.

I had to learn the hard way. When I was a triathlete (now I’m a “roadie”), I tried everything. And when I say everything, I mean EVERYTHING. It became pretty tiring, actually; almost like a full time job. I would order something, take it on a few bike rides, get a bloated stomach every time without fail, feel like crap afterwards, even the day after, and then start the search all over again. Until I moved, I did not realize all of the containers of powdered nutrition I had accumulated. A huge waste of money, and extremely stressful and defeating.

I had nearly given up. I thought all of these side effects were going to be a normal part of my training, forever. This was until I was introduced to Osmo in 2013. All of the Osmo products have a subtle, gentle flavor, but their effectiveness is not so subtle. My first ride with the Active Recovery, I was pleasantly surprised. My thirst was quenched and I was not in any kind of gastrointestinal distress during or after. A huge success!

Now I utilize their entire line of products: PreLoad Hydration, Active Hydration, and Acute Recovery. I have a happy stomach, a positive mindset and a whole lot less tubs of powdered nutrition in my cabinets!

Care to share your experiences? Send us an email at sales@osmonutrition.com

No Comments » | Posted in Training by Lisa H

Why a Kid’s Formula?

Friday October 24th, 2014

Try to Google search for “what to give my active 6 year old to drink” and the results will likely confuse you and leave you with more unanswered questions. Results will range from, Gatorade, sports drinks, coconut water, and diluted juice from the mommy bloggers. Some even claim that vitamin waters will “top off your child’s nutritional gaps”. The government’s nutrition organization, eatright.org recommendation of “lots of water” will likely pop up too. Other recommendations from doctors and other medical professionals include Pedialyte or a diluted ORS (oral rehydration solution). So what do we give our active kids?

It’s well documented in the scientific literature that hypohydration (low body water) in adults increases skin and core temperatures, leading to increased stress on the cardiovascular system, especially in the heat. In physical activity, this increased cardiovascular strain contributes to decreased physical performance (primarily in endurance exercise), increased fatigue and perception of effort, decreased motivation; coupled with increased propensity for injury, both musculoskeletal and total heat illness. But how does this translate to the younger active population?

In prepubescent kids, there is still a question of how much hypohydration creates these similar stresses in that, as compared to adults, prepubescent children experience a greater increase in core and skin temperatures as they become dehydrated. So why is this? A lower sweat rate but higher metabolic cost of locomotion is a contributing factor. In other words, kids produce more heat with less offload. Additionally, kid’s bodies have not had as much time to adapt to heat acclimatization in their short lives. So when they are active on hot summer days they are more predisposed to heat illness

And while it seems logical to just “drink lots of water” the possibility of hyponatremia in active kids becomes a concern. Hyponatremia is when you put too much water in your system causing the sodium in your body to become diluted. When this happens, your body’s water levels rise, and your cells begin to swell which can potentially cause many health problems.

Basically, there is no real defined statement of what and how much a pre-pubescent active child should drink. And while there are peer-reviewed recommendations from clinical pediatrics and the World Health Organization on rehydration/hydration for illness induced dehydration, there are actually none for the exercise induced body water losses that many of our active kids experience. That’s where we come in – the Osmo for Kids product was formulated based upon physiological data on exercising/active prepubescent kids, as well as recommendations from the clinical trials of rehydration. What we have formulated is a drink designed to hydrate our kids, based on their physiology and needs for fluid absorption.

Why formulate a different Osmo Active specifically for kids? Why not just use diluted adults’ active?

Bottom line: Kids need a different concentration of carbohydrates and electrolytes due to differences in sweat sodium concentrations, sweat rates, heat dissipation, and predisposition to hypohydration and subsequent heat illness.

Kids’ bodies are different than adults with regards to thermoregulation (getting rid of heat and sweating). The other key thing to remember is that an oral rehydration solution (ORS, Pedialyte) is for severe dehydration (e.g. from vomiting, illness, diarrhea) which is a clinical condition; different from daily dehydration from activity and/or mild illness. With these facts, the Osmo for Kids formula has been specifically designed to address the active kid’s needs.

Sodium: Kids need to ingest less sodium due to less sweat sodium losses.

The sodium content in Osmo products serve to 1) enhance fluid absorption at the level of the small intestines, 2) stimulate thirst to encourage voluntary drinking (a normal physiological protective mechanism), and 3) to help counteract sweat sodium losses. In the kids formula there is 100mg/serving as compared to the 320mg/serving of the men’s active. In the adult literature, sweat sodium losses in endurance athletes are on the upwards of 1.7-2 grams per litre; but under similar exercise conditions, the prepubescent child loses 0.75 -0.8g per litre of sweat. Thus, children need to ingest less sodium due to less sweat sodium losses. The physiological need for sodium for fluid uptake is individual- dependent on existing sodium availability within the body (this is from stores, ingested fluids/foods, blood-sodium concentrations, fluid balance hormone interaction; RDA of sodium for children 4-12 is 1.2g/day, teenage+adults is 1.5-1.8g/day).

Potassium: Kids need less potassium for fluid balance.

Potassium is needed with sodium for fluid balance, skeletal and cardiac muscle function. Unlike sodium, potassium is not readily lost in sweat but is unavoidably lost in urine, thus it too is critical for fluid balance. Again, the requirements in prepubescent children are less than adults; 30mg potassium per serving in the kids formula vs. 100mg potassium in the adults.

Carbohydrate and osmolality: Kids need a combination of a great tasting product with the optimal ratio of carbohydrates for it to be effective.

The World Health Organization oral rehydration solution recognizes the effectiveness of a low osmolality solution for promoting plasma volume expansion; with the total osmolality range of 200-245mOsm/l. The osmotic contributors in a solution are the electrolytes and the carbohydrates. To maintain an effective osmolality of ~200mOsm/L as well as to promote fluid uptake at the level of the intestines, the kids formula has been designed at a 1% carbohydrate solution comprised of glucose and sucrose. NOTE: palatability of the drink is critical for fluid uptake. If it doesn’t taste good, it won’t be consumed. Sugar and salt are key factors to palatability and physiological encouragement of drinking. The Kids’ formula has added monk fruit (a small, sweet melon that is naturally calorie-free and does not impact blood sugar like traditional sugars; it is not processed like stevia or sugar alcohols; basically it is dried powdered fruit) to increase the sweetness of the drink (preferred by kids).

Taste: Staying with the morals and ideals of Osmo, the Kids formula uses organic freeze-dried fruit , touched up by organic tangerine oil to “punch up” the flavor for kids palates. There are still no fillers or flow agents, or other ingredients that may cause hyperactivity.

So how does Osmo for Kids line up with some of the other options on the market? Take a look:

PRODUCT COMPARISON

**Both the Health Protection Branch of Canada and the Food and Drug Administration note that sodium benzoate is safe to consume in small doses, but it should not be combined with ascorbic acid, commonly known as citric acid or vitamin C, as this will develop a carcinogen know as benzene. This carcinogen is believed to cause cell death, damage to the mitochondria in cells, DNA damage, ***Polyethyelne glycol is the basis of most prescription laxatives.

Have any questions about new Kid’s line? Want to share what your kids think? We want to hear from you so drop us a line at team@osmonutrition.com

No Comments » | Posted in Training by Osmo Nutrition

Around the World in 20 Days

Thursday September 25th, 2014

OSMO checked in with Pro Triathlete Emma-Kate Lidbury  and got her to share some of what happened during her recent 20 days of world travel, racing and adventures……

It has been a fun and frantic time on Planet Eccles in the past few weeks, with two races in the space of a week plus some serious globetrotting. Us pro triathletes are almost as good at totting up airmiles as we are swim, bike, run miles!

I kicked off September with the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Mont Tremblant, Quebec. What a terrific venue for a race! This was always going to be a barnburner of a race and it did not disappoint.

As I’ve previously mentioned on the Osmo blog, this season has been a challenging one for me with injuries and illness sidelining me for longer than anyone would have liked, so in many ways I was simply proud to be on the start line at the Worlds. I prepared as best I could and was proud of my effort on the day. Finishing 17th was obviously not the result I am truly capable of or working towards, but if I’ve learned anything this year it’s that sometimes it’s the journey that counts, not the end result.

Less than 48 hours after racing in Quebec I was jetting to China for IMG’s Beijing International Triathlon. This was the third year the race had been held and each year IMG invites a dozen pros – six men, six women – to take part alongside the age group race.

Having spent plenty of time travelling in South East Asia in my twenties, I thought I had a fair idea of what to expect from China. This would be my first visit and I went with eyes wide open ready for a new adventure. Of course, the first part of the adventure was the epic journey in itself: a 90-minute drive from Mont Tremblant to Montreal, a 90-minute flight from Montreal to Toronto and then a 13-hour flight from Toronto to Beijing in which I would fast forward 12 hours due to time zone changes.

On arrival in Beijing I was a true space cadet and it must have said something about my level of fatigue that I was able to nod off during the hour-long taxi ride from the airport to our hotel. Perhaps the fact it was dark helped disguise the crazy driving that goes on here! Imagine Scaletrix at warp speed and you begin to get a grasp of the death-defying madness. It would only be in daylight in the ensuing days that I would begin to get a real taste for the anarchy on the roads. Red traffic light? That’s but a mere suggestion, no need to actually stop!

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The longer we spent in Beijing the more I realized it is a place of     controlled chaos – everything works, everything eventually unfolds as it should, but it all happens with a crazy, fierce and boisterous intensity. The gulf between rich and poor is vast, greater than in any other country I’ve visited and Westerners still intrigue and amaze the Chinese. I’ve never been in so many selfies or been gawped at quite so intensely while running or riding. I guess a 5ft 10 suntanned Westerner in run kit stands out a little!

The race itself was a fun affair – especially as I was the only long distance race surrounded by ITU specialists. My fast twitch muscle fibres have been AWOL for many years now, so it was definitely a two-hour pain management exercise! The bike and run courses were brutal and much of the bike course had been built specifically for this race. I finished 5th and definitely knew it was time for some R&R after an intense week of racing and travel.

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Our final day saw us venture to the Great Wall of China – a place that has always been on my bucket list. It was a brutally hot day and we were all suffering with race-battered legs, which made all the Great Wall steps that much more intense! I was definitely grateful to be carrying plenty of Osmo Active Hydration sachets with me, because as the mercury climbed and there was nowhere to hide from the heat I could feel my body beginning to wither. Hydration is most definitely power!

I was very glad I consulted with Osmo boffin Dr Stacy Sims before flying back to LA as I was keen to mitigate the effects of jetlag on my return trip. I’m always very diligent about staying hydrated while flying, but she also had me eating almost only protein throughout the flight and drinking plenty of Osmo Acute Recovery (which is a 15g protein hit per scoop).

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For the first 48 hours back home, I also kept my sunnies off and spent as long as possible in the sunshine to try to trick my body back into LA time. Given that I flew for 17 hours from Beijing back to LA and technically landed only one hour after taking off (!), I have to say the tips worked wonders. I hit the ground running on my return and am now gearing up for my final race of the season, Challenge Rancho Cordova in northern California on October 5.

I’ll be back with news from that race in a couple of weeks!

Cheers,
Eccles

No Comments » | Posted in Cool Stuff, On the road, OSMO Athletes, Training by Osmo Nutrition

#InstaAwesome

Friday September 5th, 2014

That hashtag lingo is about to become very prevalent as we launch our Awesome Orange kids product. Its you moms who will quickly get the concept that instantly you can change the nutritional and performance path of your child by introducing Awesome Orange in to their lives, Quite simply, you are an #InstaAwesome Mom buy providing a hydration solution for your kids and in turn your kids who use Awesome Orange will discover what it means to be #InstaAwesome themselves once they start making the products a regular part of their life.

Dr. Stacy Sims checked in with us to share details about this incredible new opportunity, how it came to be, and to share some of the since behind this really impressive product. Here is what she had to say:

Why a kids formula??

When you put in a general google search for “what to give my active 6 year old to drink” the results range from mom-blogs stating “Gatorade or other sports drink, coconut water, or diluted juice”, “vitamin waters (to top up your child’s nutritional gaps), to the government’s eatright.org recommending “lots of water”. Other recommendations often heard from doctors or other medical professionals include pedialyte or a diluted ORS (oral rehydration solution). Basically, there are no real conclusive statements of what and how much a pre-pubscent active child should drink; the basis for our kids formula. (**there are peer-reviewed recommendations from clinical pediatrics and the W.H.O. on rehydration/hydration for illness induced dehydration [body water losses of >4%] but none for the exercise induced body water losses of <3%).

It is well documented in the scientific literature that hypohydration in adults increases skin and core temperatures, leading to increased stress on the cardiovascular system, especially in the heat. In physical activity, this increased cardiovascular strain contributes to decreased physical performance (primarily in endurance exercise), increases fatigue and perception of effort, decreases motivation; coupled with increased propensity for injury, both musculoskeletal and total heat illness. In prepubescent kids, there is still a question of how much hypohydration creates these similar stresses in that , as compared to adults, prepubescent children experience a greater increase in core and skin temperatures as they become dehydrated. Factors which contribute to this include a lower sweat rate but higher metabolic cost of locomotion (eg more heat produced with less offload) as well as a higher surface area to body mass. Heat acclimatization (adjusting to hot conditions due to repeated exposure, eg hot summers days with activity) is slower to occur in children; predisposing them to heat illness. Another concern, in view of the “drink lots of water” recommendation, is the possibility of hyponatremia in active kids. (Clinically, hyponatremia is defined as a serum sodium level of <135mEq L-1, as well as referred to as a rapid lowering of blood sodium- note that blood sodium usually rests ~140-145mEq L-1, and with the rapid ingestion of plain water, blood sodium dilution is a distinct occurrence).

Why formulate a different Osmo Active specifically for kids? Why not just use diluted adults’ active? Sodium: The sodium content in Osmo products is to 1) enhance fluid absorption at the level of the small intestines, 2) stimulate thirst to encourage voluntary drinking (a normal physiological protective mechanism) , and 3) to help counteract sweat sodium losses. In the kids formula there is 100mg/serving as compared to the 320mg/serving of the men’s active. In the adult literature, sweat sodium losses in endurance athletes are on the upwards of 1.7-2 grams per litre; but under similar exercise conditions, the prepubescent child loses 0.75 -0.8g per litre of sweat. Thus, children need to ingest less sodium due to less sweat sodium losses. The physiological need for sodium for fluid uptake is individual- dependent on existing sodium availability within the body (this is from stores, ingested fluids/foods, blood-sodium concentrations, fluid balance hormone interaction; RDA of sodium for children 4-12 is 1.2g/day, teenage+adults is 1.5-1.8g/day). Potassium: Potassium is needed with sodium for fluid balance, skeletal and cardiac muscle function. Unlike sodium, potassium is not readily lost in sweat but is unavoidably lost in urine, thus it too is critical for fluid balance. Again, the requirements in prepubescent children are less than adults; 30mg potassium per serving in the kids formula vs 100mg potassium in the adults; Still keeping at a 3:1 ratio of sodium:potassium for fluid balance.

Carbohydrates/sugars and osmolality. The World Health Organization oral rehydration solution recognizes the effectiveness of a low osmolality solution for promoting plasma volume expansion; with the total osmolality range of 200-245mOsm/l. The osmotic contributors in a solution are the electrolytes and the carbohydrates. To maintain an effective osmolality of ~200mOsm/L as well as to promote fluid uptake at the level of the intestines, the kids formula has been designed at a 1% carbohydrate solution comprised of glucose and sucrose. NOTE: palatability of the drink is critical for fluid uptake. If it doesn’t taste good, it won’t be consumed. Sugar and salt are key factors to palatability and physiological encouragement of drinking. The kids formula has added monk fruit (a small, sweet melon that is naturally calorie-free and does not impact blood sugar like traditional sugars; it is not processed like stevia or sugar alcohols; basically it is dried powdered fruit) to increase the sweetness of the drink (what kids want!).

Flavoring: Staying with the morals and ideals of Osmo, the kids formula uses organic freeze-dried fruit for color and flavor, touched up by organic tangerine oil/essence to “punch up” the flavor for kids palates. There are still no fillers or flow agents, or other ingredients that may cause hyperactivity (From this mom’s point of view, CRITICAL!).

Bottom line: Kids need a different concentration of carbohydrates and electrolytes due to differences in sweat sodium concentrations, sweat rates, heat dissipation, and predisposition to hypohydration and subsequent heat illness.

No Comments » | Posted in Cool Stuff, Hydration, Training by Osmo Nutrition

Refuel, rest, recover, repeat…

Wednesday August 27th, 2014

by Emma-Kate Lidbury

For many triathletes, learning to rest and recover is actually harder than working out. Triathlon tends to attract “Type A” personalities who typically want to do it all, do it perfectly and do it yesterday – but that’s not always the best route forward for the human body to get fitter, faster and stronger. It has taken me many years of doing this sport to truly learn the value in resting, recovering, sleeping and adapting – and boy what a valuable lesson that is to learn!

I say this because I’m currently typing this from the comfort of my bed in the middle of the afternoon as I enjoy some well earned recovery days following a training camp in Lake Tahoe, northern California. The camp was run by my coach Matt Dixon, of purplepatch, alongside Tower 26 swim coach Gerry Rodrigues and purplepatch bike coach and guru Paul Buick. With 10 age groupers and four pros in attendance it was a fun group who all really maximized the opportunity to swim, bike and run in a seriously beautiful part of the world. Some of the riding up there is extraordinary and swimming in the crystal clear waters of Donner Lake was stunning.

When in a training camp environment and putting together several big days of work it’s hugely important to nail your hydration, nutrition and fueling. Fortunately I have Osmo’s Dr Stacy Sims on my side so I felt well prepared. Each day I was typically drinking 24oz of Osmo Active Hydration during swim workouts and following this up immediately post-workout with Osmo Acute Recovery to ensure prompt refueling and optimal recovery. I have found the sooner I get this down, the better I feel and the faster I recover ready for the next session. I’ve also become addicted to Acute Recovery with a little caffeine added: try one scoop Acute Recovery mixed with 6-8oz almond milk and a shot of espresso and you will be rocking! In a bid to rehydrate well, I often also take on about 12-16oz of Osmo Pre Load between sessions. I find this helps not just my hydration levels but also help keep my body alkaline through the day (now that’s probably another blog post in itself).

On the bike I typically aim to drink approximately 24oz of Osmo Active Hydration per hour and, as with post-swim sessions, I’ll follow it up with Acute Recovery, but if it’s later in the day I’ll skip the caffeine hit. When running, if it’s a longer/heavier session we’ll often have Matt and Paul riding alongside us carrying drinks and so I’ll have an icy cold bottle of Active Hydration to sip along the way. With the mercury rising well into the 80s while we were in Tahoe it was sometimes hard to drink enough, but I know what a huge difference it makes to my training and recovery if I stay on top of it.

Right before bedtime, I swig one final scoop of Acute Recovery mixed with almond milk to assist with overnight restoration and muscle synthesis – and to help me get the best night’s sleep possible ready for the next day of fun on camp. With the hard work done, it’s now time to let it all soak in before the final two weeks of work leading in to the Ironman 70.3 World Championships on September 7. See you there!

- Eccles

No Comments » | Posted in Hydration, Nutrition, OSMO Athletes, Triathlon by Osmo Nutrition

Osmo Joins Tinkoff-Saxo Training Camp

Friday August 22nd, 2014

A few clouds and some rain gracing the Colorado skies didn’t stop team Tinkoff-Saxo from a successful training camp leading up to this week’s US Pro Challenge. It was a wet Thursday morning when Osmo’s Lisa Hunt met up with the team after one of their rides. Pulling up to greet the riders roadside, Lisa was joined by Jason Lambert from ProBar to spend some time with the team.

A team lunch at their hotel in Snowmass provided the perfect venue to spend some time getting to know the riders and getting the valuable feedback in person that helps Osmo continue to improve and create the best performance hydration products on the market.

During lunch Lisa spent time with the team staff including Bruno Cenghialta, the Italian former powerhouse pro rider, who is one of the Sports Directors at Tinkoff-Saxo as well as the other Sports Director, Lars Michaelsen. The room was packed with riders and staff from all over the world and while languages from multiple countries were being spoken, when it came time to deliver the post ride brief, English was the language of choice.

The team took over the hotel restaurant and lunch included grilled salmon and grilled veggies. After lunch, impromptu chats with riders allowed Osmo to hear what the riders really think about Osmo. What was truly exciting was to hear directly from riders just how enthusiastic they are about the products.

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“I especially love the Acute Recovery. I can drink it and immediately I feel better. And I don’t need to eat a full meal, because it satisfies me. Sometimes I make a shake; but usually I just drink it with water” said team rider Michael Morkov. Overall Acute Recovery was the favorite amongst most.

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And rider after rider shared that Active was so easy to drink and didn’t upset their stomach. Rafal Majka was quick to tell us “Osmo is fantastic. So easy to drink. In the Tour of Poland, it’s all I drank.”

Lisa left Colorado just before the US Pro Challenge started, wishing the team well and knowing they were set up to race well this week. To follow how the team is doing, be sure to check out their website for updates here.

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No Comments » | Posted in Hydration, On the road, OSMO Athletes, Training by Osmo Nutrition

It was a great three weeks of racing from all teams and now the 2014 Tour de France has come to a close. Not surprisingly this year’s race brought on incredible challenges right from the get go. Osmo was proud to support team Tinkoff Saxo and so, along with his team, we were saddened to watch Tour contender Alberto Contador leave the race early on due to his crash. And though this changed everything for team Tinkoff Saxo, the remainder of the race was equally exciting and provided some great successes for the rest of the team with Rafal Majka winning two stages as well as the polka dot jersey and Michael Rogers winning a stage as well.

We want to congratulate the entire team and admire their strength and determination to perform extraordinarily well even when forced to reshape race plans after Contador withdrew. 2015 will be here before we know it and Contador will surely be back at it to claim a win. Tinkoff Saxo still has a packed schedule of racing for the reminder of this year including Vuelta a Espana at the end of August. Be sure to follow the team and find out where they will be here.

In case you missed it, Osmo’s own Stacy Sims made a televised appearance during the Tour to share how Osmo worked with the team and to share with viewers what Osmo is all about. Check it out:


The Perfect Mix Instagram Contest

Wednesday July 23rd, 2014

The Tour might almost be over but we continue to be inspired to ride and are going to enjoy every last moment and we want you too as well. So to get you motivated to log some extra miles this week we want you to win the perfect mix of hydration and fueling products.

We just launched a contest with our friends at ProBar to help you win the perfect mix of Osmo and ProBar products. Be sure to follow us on Instagram @osmonutrition and enter to win! Entering is simple – Take a Ride + Snap a Pic = Win the Perfect Mix!

Get a pic of you riding with Osmo, ProBar, or Tinkoff Saxo products in your image and post on Instagram. Be sure to tag #Tinkoff4TDF #osmonutrition and #ProBar for your chance to win! Winners will randomly be selected on July 27th – show us what you’ve got!

No Comments » | Posted in Cool Stuff, Nutrition, Training by Osmo Nutrition

Back in the Game

Thursday July 17th, 2014

Pro Triathlete and Osmo athlete Emma-Kate Lidbury shares her Vineman race report…..

After a tough couple of months of injury and illness, reaching the start line at 70.3 Vineman this past weekend was a victory in itself. I absolutely loved this race last year, so when planning this season I earmarked it as a “special” one –and it would become special for very different reasons than those I’d originally intended.

Under my original 2014 plans – let’s call this ‘Plan A’ – Vineman was a race that my coach and I set aside as one of three or four races this year where I would really be looking to perform and have a stellar day. Unfortunately, like the rest of us, we did not have a crystal ball, so had no clue about how the year might change – and how Plan A might become Plan B or Plan C.

At the start of the year I was on fire in training and feeling so strong. I would be unstoppable this year! Watch out world, I’m coming through! In the space of a few short weeks, though, things changed drastically…

Anyone who’s suffered with plantar fasciitis will know that once you’ve had it, it can often raise its ugly head once again. And again. After logging some of my finest run training yet, I was soon sidelined and hugely frustrated. To add insult to injury, some routine blood tests returned showing I had a nasty stomach infection that was going to require strong medication and a radical dietary overhaul. What I thought was going to be a red hot summer of racing actually became a seriously challenging time of adversity. Instead of racing Escape from Alcatraz, 70.3 Kansas and 70.3 Mont Tremblant in June I stayed at home in LA to rest, recover and rehab. Frustrating? Yes. Easy? No. Stronger for it now? Absolutely.

Like every other pro athlete out there – triathlete or not – I learned that these tough times are actually little tests. Hey you! Yes, you! Do you really want this? Do you really want to do it? Because none of this is going to be easy. So if you want it, then saddle up and learn. Learn the art of resilience. Learn how to stay focused and keep believing in yourself. Learn that you are only as good as the support network around you.

70.3 Vineman was a celebration of all of that. It was a celebration of me learning perhaps one of the biggest lessons of my professional career so far – and arguably the most important. Resilience is everything. It seems so odd now to say that I was delighted to simply “be” at Vineman when the ‘old’ me was looking to knock it out of the park there. When I reached the final mile of the race on Sunday I felt a huge wave of emotion and relief. It was great to be back, but be back as a newer, better, stronger version of me.

Huge thanks to my aforementioned support network and all of my sponsors, without whom I simply would not have reached that start line. Special mention to my coaches Matt Dixon and Gerry Rodrigues and Osmo’s Dr Stacy Sims, whose help with nutrition over the past few months has been extraordinary. More details on that in my next blog.
Onwards!


Eccles

No Comments » | Posted in Training by Osmo Nutrition