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Women are not Small Men: USA Cycling Coaching Summit presentation 2013


Abstract:

COS SUMMIT OCTOBER 13 Women are not small men REF

Intestinal fluid absorption during exercise: role of sports drink osmolality and[Na+]

Authors: Gisolfi CV., Lambert G>P>, and Summers R.W.

Source: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 33(6), 2001, 907-915.


Abstract:

This study focused on the combined effects of hypotonicity and high [Na+] in a fluid replacement beverage ingested orally by exercising normal healthy euhydrated adults.  Formulation of the ideal fluid replacement beverage during prolonged exercise remains unclear. A single beverage suitable for all environmental and race conditions probably does not exist. To maximize water absorption, consideration should be given to studying beverages formulated with a) CHO in multiple forms (to possibly enhance solute transport) but in reduced concentration (2–4%) from previous formulations to reduce osmolality; and b) Na+ to reduce Na+secretion in the duodenum, which serves to attenuate the osmotic flow of water from the blood into the intestinal lumen.

Water and Electrolyte Requirements for Exercise

Authors: Latzka W.A. & Montain S. J.

Source: Clinics in Sports Medicine 18(3), 1999, 513-525


Abstract:

Maintenance of water and electrolyte balance is important for sustaining cognitive and physical performance. Dehydration degrades morale and desire to work. Body water deficits of as little as 2% body weight can impair physical performance. Water deficits of 5% to 7% body weight are associated with dyspnea, headaches, dizziness, and apathy. Water deficit and salt depletion are also considered significant risk factors for the development of heat illness during hot-weather activities. Excessive overhydration can also be detrimental to cognitive and physical performance. People consuming excessive quantities of water during physical activities can produce a relatively rapid dilution of plasma electrolytes if the kidneys are unable to excrete the excess fluid. This behavior can result in intracranial swelling and development of “water intoxication”-a syndrome manifested by altered CNS function, nausea, and impaired physical abilities?
This article summarizes the water and electrolyte losses during exercise and presents strategies to optimize hydration state before, during, and following exercise.

Hydration: Is your sports drink making you dehydrated?


Abstract:

USACycling Webinar 7 March 2013

Growth-Hormone responses to consecutive exercise bouts with ingestion of protein plus carbohydrate


Abstract:

James A. Betts, Keith A. Stokes, Rebecca J. Toone, Clyde Williams;   IJSNEM Volume 23, Issue 3, June 2013, 23, 259 – 270


Endocrine responses to repeated exercise have barely been investigated, and no data are available regarding the mediating influence of nutrition. On 3 occasions, participants ran for 90 min at 70% VO2max (R1) before a second exhaustive treadmill run at the same intensity (R2; 91.6 ± 17.9 min). During the intervening 4-hr recovery, participants ingested either 0.8 g sucrose · kg–1 · hr–1 with 0.3 g · kg–1 · hr–1 whey-protein isolate (CHO-PRO), 0.8 g sucrose · kg–1 · hr–1 (CHO), or 1.1 g sucrose · kg–1 · hr–1 (CHO-CHO). The latter 2 solutions therefore matched the former for carbohydrate or for available energy, respectively. Serum growth-hormone concentrations increased from 2 ± 1 μg/L to 17 ± 8 μg/L during R1 considered across all treatments (M ± SD; p ≤ .01). Concentrations were similar immediately after R2 irrespective of whether CHO or CHO-CHO was ingested (19 ± 4 μg/L and 19 ± 5 μg/L, respectively), whereas ingestion of CHO-PRO produced an augmented response (31 ± 4 μg/L; p ≤ .05). Growth-hormone-binding protein concentrations were unaffected by R1 but increased similarly across all treatments during R2 (from 414 ± 202 pmol/L to 577 ± 167 pmol/L; p ≤ .01), as was the case for plasma total testosterone (from 9.3 ± 3.3 nmol/L to 14.7 ± 4.6 nmol/L; p ≤ .01). There was an overall treatment effect for serum cortisol (p ≤ .05), with no specific differences at any given time point but lower concentrations immediately after R2 with CHO-PRO (608 ± 133 nmol/L) than with CHO (796 ± 278 nmol/L) or CHO-CHO (838 ± 134 nmol/L). Ingesting carbohydrate with added whey-protein isolate during short-term recovery from 90 min of treadmill running increases the growth-hormone response to a second exhaustive exercise bout of similar duration.

 

Effects of carbohydrate type and concentration and solution osmolality on water absorption

Authors: X. Shi, RW Summers, HP Schedl, SW Flanagan, R. Chang, and CV Gisolfi

Source: Med Sci Sports Exerc 27(12), 1607 -1615


Abstract:

We studied intestinal absorption of solutions containing either one (glucose, Glu, or maltodextrin, Mal) or two (fructose, Fru, and Glu or sucrose, Suc) transportable carbohydrate (CHO) substrates using segmental perfusion technique in eight healthy male subjects. These CHO were either free or directly transportable monosaccharides (Glu, Fru), bound as the disaccharide (sucrose, Suc), or as oligomers (maltodextrins, Mal). [CHO] was varied from 6% to 8% (120-444 mmol.1(-1)). All solutions contained low [Na+] (15-19 mEq) and [K+] (3-4 mEq). Solutions osmolalities varied from 165 to 477 mOsm.kg(-1). Osmolalities in the test segment ranged from 268 to 314 mOsm.kg(-1). The regression line of osmolality with water absorption differed for single as compared with multiple substrate solutions. The significantly different intercepts of these two regression lines suggest that solutions with multiple substrates produce greater water absorption at a given osmolality than those with one. Comparing all solutions, test segment solute flux (partial r = 0.69) was more important than mean osmolality (partial r = 0.32). In conclusion, solutions with multiple substrates stimulate several different solute absorption mechanisms yielding greater water absorption than solutions with only one substrate.

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Sodium loading aids fluid balance and reduces physiological strain of trained men exercising in the heat

Authors: Stacy T. Sims, L van Vliet, JD Cotter, and NJ Rehrer

Source: Medicine and Sciences in Sports and Exercise, 39 (1), 123-130, 2007.


Abstract:

Purpose: This study was conducted to determine whether preexercise ingestion of a highly concentrated sodium beverage would increase plasma volume (PV) and reduce the physiological strain of moderately trained males running in the heat. Methods: Eight endurance-trained (VO2max: 58 mLIkg-1Imin-1 (SD 5); 36 yr (SD 11)) runners completed this double-blind, crossover experiment. Runners ingested a high-sodium (High Na+: 164 mmol Na+IL-1) or low-sodium (Low Na+: 10 mmol Na+IL-1) beverage (10 mLIkg-1) before running to exhaustion at 70% VO2max in warm conditions (32-C, 50% RH, Va $ 1.5 mIs-1). Beverages (~757 mL) were ingested in seven portions across 60 min beginning 105 min before exercise. Trials were separated by 1–3 wk. Heart rate and core and skin temperatures were measured throughout exercise. Urine and venous blood were sampled before and after drinking and exercise. Results: High Na+ increased PV before exercise (4.5% (SD 3.7)), calculated from Hct and [Hb]), whereas Low Na+did not (0.0% (SD 0.5); P = 0.04), and involved greater time to exercise termination in the six who stopped because of an ethical end point (core temperature 39.5-C: 57.9 min (SD 6) vs 46.4 min (SD 4); P = 0.04) and those who were exhausted (96.1 min (SD 22) vs 75.3 min (SD 21); P = 0.03; High Na+ vs Low Na+, respectively). At equivalent times before exercise termination, High Na+ also resulted in lower core temperature (38.9 vs 39.3-C; P = 0.00) and perceived exertion (P = 0.01) and a tendency for lower heart rate (164 vs 174 bpm; P = 0.08). Conclusions: Preexercise ingestion of a high-sodium beverage increased plasma volume before exercise and involved less thermoregulatory and perceived strain during exercise and increased exercise capacity in warm conditions.

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Pre-exercise sodium loading aids fluid balance and endurance for women exercising in the heat

Authors: Stacy T. Sims, Nancy J. Rehrer, Melanie L. Bell, and James D. Cotter. School of Physical Education, Department of Human Nutrition, and Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Source: Journal of Applied Physiology, 103, 534-541, 2007


Abstract:

This study was conducted SD 25.6) vs. 78.7 (SD 24.6) min; 95% confidence interval: 13.3, 26.8; P < 0.0001]. Core temperature rose more quickly with Low Na+ [1.6°C/h (SD 0.2)] than High Na+ [1.2°C/h (SD 0.2); P = 0.04]. Plasma [AVP], [Na+] concentration, and osmolality, and urine volume, [Na+], and osmolality decreased with sodium loading (P < 0.05) independent of pill usage. Thus preexercise ingestion of a concentrated sodium beverage increased PV, reduced thermoregulatory strain, and increased exercise capacity for women in the high-hormone phase of natural and oral contraceptive pill-mediated menstrual cycles, in warm conditions.

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Endogenous and Exogenous female sex hormones and renal electrolyte handling: effects of an acute sodium load on plasma volume at rest.

Authors: ST Sims, NJ Rehrer, ML Bell, and JD Cotter.

Source: Journal of Applied Physiology, 105(1), 121-127, 2008


Abstract:

This study was conducted to investigate effects of an acute sodium load on resting plasma volume (PV) and renal mechanisms across the menstrual cycle of endurance-trained women with natural (NAT) or oral contraceptive pill (OCP) controlled cycles. Twelve women were assigned to one of two groups, according to their usage status: 1) OCP [n = 6, 29 yr (SD 6), 59.4 kg (SD 3.2)], or 2) NAT [n = 6, 24 yr (SD 5), 61.3 kg (SD 3.6)]. The sodium load was administered as a concentrated sodium chloride/citrate beverage (164 mmol Na+/l, 253 mosmol/kgH2O, 10 ml/kg body mass) during the last high-hormone week of the OCP cycle (OCPhigh) or late luteal phase of the NAT cycle (NAThigh) and during the low-hormone sugar pill week of OCP (OCPlow) or early follicular phase of the NAT cycle (NATlow). The beverage (∼628 ml) was ingested in seven portions across 60 min. Over the next 4 h, PV expanded more in the low-hormone phase for both groups (time-averaged change): OCPlow 6.1% (SD 1.1) and NATlow 5.4% (SD 1.2) vs. OCPhigh 3.9% (SD 0.9) and NAThigh 3.5% (SD 0.8) (P = 0.02). The arginine vasopressin increased less in the low-hormone phase [1.63 (SD 0.2) and 1.30 pg/ml (SD 0.2) vs. 1.82 (SD 0.3) and 1.57 pg/ml (SD 0.5), P = 0.0001], as did plasma aldosterone concentration (∼64% lower, P = 0.0001). Thus PV increased more and renal hormone sensitivity was decreased in the low-hormone menstrual phase following sodium/fluid ingestion, irrespective of OCP usage.

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The Effect of Adding Caffeine to Postexercise Carbohydrate Feeding on Subsequent High-Intensity Interval-Running Capacity Compared With Carbohydrate Alone

Authors: Conor Taylor, Daniel Higham, Graeme L. Close, and James P. Morton

Source: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2011, 21, 410 -416.


Abstract:

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that adding caffeine to postexercise carbohydrate (CHO) feedings improves subsequent high-intensity interval-running capacity compared with CHO alone. In a repeated-measures design, 6 men performed a glycogen-depleting exercise protocol until volitional exhaustion in the morning. Immediately after and at 1, 2, and 3 hr postexercise, participants consumed 1.2 g/kg body mass CHO of a 15% CHO solution, a similar CHO solution but with addition of 8 mg/kg body mass of caffeine (CHO+CAFF), or an equivalent volume of flavored water only (WAT). After the 4-hr recovery period, participants performed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) to volitional exhaustion as a measure of high-intensity interval-running capacity. Average blood glucose values during the 4-hr recovery period were higher in the CHO conditions (p < .005) than in the WAT trial (4.6 ± 0.3 mmol/L), although there was no difference (p = .46) between CHO (6.2 ± 0.8 mmol/L) and CHO+CAFF (6.7 ± 1.0 mmol/L). Exercise capacity during the LIST was significantly longer in the CHO+CAFF trial (48 ± 15 min) than in the CHO (32 ± 15 min, p = .04) and WAT conditions (19 ± 6 min, p = .001). All 6 participants improved performance in CHO+CAFF compared with CHO (95% CI for mean difference = 1–32 min). The study provides novel data by demonstrating that adding caffeine to postexercise CHO feeding improves subsequent high-intensity interval-running capacity, a finding that may be related to higher rates of postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis previously observed under similar feeding conditions.

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High rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after exhaustive exercise when carbohydrate is coingested with caffeine

Authors: David J. Pedersen, Sarah J. Lessard, Vernon G. Coffey, Emmanuel G. Churchley, Andrew M. Wootton, They Ng, Matthew J. Watt and John A. Hawley

Source: J Appl Physiol 105:7-13, 2008


Abstract:

We determined the effect of coingestion of caffeine (Caff) with carbohydrate (CHO) on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from exhaustive exercise in seven trained subjects who completed two experimental trials in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. The evening before an experiment subjects performed intermittent exhaustive cycling and then consumed a low-CHO meal. The next morning subjects rode until volitional fatigue. On completion of this ride subjects consumed either CHO [4 g/kg body mass (BM)] or the same amount of CHO + Caff (8 mg/kg BM) during 4 h of passive recovery. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken at regular intervals throughout recovery. Muscle glycogen levels were similar at exhaustion [∼75 mmol/kg dry wt (dw)] and increased by a similar amount (∼80%) after 1 h of recovery (133 ± 37.8 vs. 149 ± 48 mmol/kg dw for CHO and Caff, respectively). After 4 h of recovery Caff resulted in higher glycogen accumulation (313 ± 69 vs. 234 ± 50 mmol/kg dw, P < 0.001). Accordingly, the overall rate of resynthesis for the 4-h recovery period was 66% higher in Caff compared with CHO (57.7 ± 18.5 vs. 38.0 ± 7.7 mmol•kg dw–1•h–1, P < 0.05). After 1 h of recovery plasma Caff levels had increased to 31 ± 11 µM (P < 0.001) and at the end of the recovery reached 77 ± 11 µM (P < 0.001) with Caff. Phosphorylation of CaMKThr286 was similar after exercise and after 1 h of recovery, but after 4 h CaMKThr286 phosphorylation was higher in Caff than CHO (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)Thr172 and AktSer473 was similar for both treatments at all time points. We provide the first evidence that in trained subjects coingestion of large amounts of Caff (8 mg/kg BM) with CHO has an additive effect on rates of postexercise muscle glycogen accumulation compared with consumption of CHO alone.

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Antioxidants prevent health-promoting effects of physical exercise in humans.

Authors: Michael Ristowa, Kim Zarsea, Andreas Oberbachc, Nora Klotingc, Marc Birringera, Michael Kiehntopfd, Michael Stumvollc, C. Ronald Kahne, and Matthias Bluher

Source: PNAS, 2009;106(21):8665-8670


Abstract:

Exercise promotes longevity and ameliorates type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. However, exercise also increases mitochondrial formation of presumably harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS). Antioxidants are widely used as supplements but whether they affect the health-promoting effects of exercise is unknown. We evaluated the effects of a combination of vitamin C (1000 mg/day) and vitamin E (400 IU/day) on insulin sensitivity as measured by glucose infusion rates (GIR) during a hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in previously untrained (n = 19) and pretrained (n = 20) healthy young men. Before and after a 4 week intervention of physical exercise, GIR was determined, and muscle biopsies for gene expression analyses as well as plasma samples were obtained to compare changes over baseline and potential influences of vitamins on exercise effects. Exercise increased parameters of insulin sensitivity (GIR and plasma adiponectin) only in the absence of antioxidants in both previously untrained (P < 0.001) and pretrained (P < 0.001) individuals. This was paralleled by increased expression of ROS-sensitive transcriptional regulators of insulin sensitivity and ROS defense capacity, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and PPARγ coactivators PGC1α and PGC1β only in the absence of antioxidants (P < 0.001 for all). Molecular mediators of endogenous ROS defense (superoxide dismutases 1 and 2; glutathione peroxidase) were also induced by exercise, and this effect too was blocked by antioxidant supplementation. Consistent with the concept of mitohormesis, exercise-induced oxidative stress ameliorates insulin resistance and causes an adaptive response promoting endogenous antioxidant defense capacity. Supplementation with antioxidants may preclude these health-promoting effects of exercise in humans.

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Timing of amino acid-carbohydrate ingestion alters anabolic response of muscle to resistance exercise.

Authors: Kevin D. Tipton, Blake B. Rasmussen, Sharon L. Miller, Steven E. Wolf, Sharla K. Owens-Stovall, Bart E. Petrini, and Robert R. Wolfe

Source: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, 281(2), E197–E206. (2001).


Abstract:

The present study was designed to determine whether consumption of an oral essential amino acid-carbohydrate supplement (EAC) before exercise results in a greater anabolic response than supplementation after resistance exercise. Six healthy human subjects participated in two trials in random order, PRE (EAC consumed immediately before exercise), and POST (EAC consumed immediately after exercise). A primed, continuous infusion ofL-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine, femoral arteriovenous catheterization, and muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were used to determine phenylalanine concentrations, enrichments, and net uptake across the leg. Blood and muscle phenylalanine concentrations were increased by ∼130% after drink consumption in both trials. Amino acid delivery to the leg was increased during exercise and remained elevated for the 2 h after exercise in both trials. Delivery of amino acids (amino acid concentration times blood flow) was significantly greater in PRE than in POST during the exercise bout and in the 1st h after exercise (P < 0.05). Total net phenylalanine uptake across the leg was greater (P = 0.0002) during PRE (209 ± 42 mg) than during POST (81 ± 19). Phenylalanine disappearance rate, an indicator of muscle protein synthesis from blood amino acids, increased after EAC consumption in both trials. These results indicate that the response of net muscle protein synthesis to consumption of an EAC solution immediately before resistance exercise is greater than that when the solution is consumed after exercise, primarily because of an increase in muscle protein synthesis as a result of increased delivery of amino acids to the leg.

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Protein and amino acids for athletes

Authors: K.D. Tipton and R. R. Wolfe

Source: Journal of Sports Sciences, 2004, 22, 65–79


Abstract:

The main determinants of an athlete’s protein needs are their training regime and habitual nutrient intake. Most athletes ingest sufficient protein in their habitual diet. Additional protein will confer only a minimal, albeit arguably important, additional advantage. Given sufficient energy intake, lean body mass can be maintained within a wide range of protein intakes. Since there is limited evidence for harmful effects of a high protein intake and there is a metabolic rationale for the efficacy of an increase in protein, if muscle hypertrophy is the goal, a higher protein intake within the context of an athlete’s overall dietary requirements may be beneficial. However, there are few convincing outcome data to indicate that the ingestion of a high amount of protein (2-3 g x kg(-1) BW x day(-1), where BW = body weight) is necessary. Current literature suggests that it may be too simplistic to rely on recommendations of a particular amount of protein per day. Acute studies suggest that for any given amount of protein, the metabolic response is dependent on other factors, including the timing of ingestion in relation to exercise and/or other nutrients, the composition of ingested amino acids and the type of protein.

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